Methodological Innovations for Assessing Learning in Digital Spaces

Research areas 
Digital Cultures
Learning Analytics
Research team 

Dragan Gasevic, Jen Scott-Curwood, Amani Bell, Abelardo Pardo, Jen Ross

Funding 

University of Edinburgh and University of Sydney Partnership Collaboration Award

Dates 
01 Jul 201730 Apr 2018

Professor Dragan Gasevic and Dr Jen Ross, working with Dr Jen Scott Curwood, Associate Professor Abelardo Pardo, and Dr Amani Bell from the Centre for Research in Learning and Innovation at the University of Sydney, have been awarded a Partnership Collaboration Award on the topic of Methodological Innovations for Assessing Learning in Digital Spaces.

This project will build on existing synergies and research connections between the Centre for Research in Digital Education and the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation. Focused on cutting edge methodologies for designing and assessing student learning in digital spaces, the project weaves together two complementary strands: an approach to multimodal assessment and a framework to analyse learning strategies in digital spaces.

Higher education increasingly involves teaching and learning across physical and digital contexts. For students, this allows them the opportunity to engage with digital artefacts, to represent their knowledge in multimodal forms, and to collaborate across time and space. For university teachers, this presents the challenges of designing digital learning spaces, creating innovative assessments, and developing new approaches to assessment and feedback. The institutional contexts of the two Centres explicitly foreground the value of digital practices and creativity, and in addition to the research-related benefits of this project, key strategic aims will also be advanced.

In this project, scholars and educators from The University of Sydney and The University of Edinburgh will work together to develop and research innovative pedagogical and methodological approaches to designing and assessing student learning in digital spaces. These approaches focus on 1) assessing student production of multimodal artefacts, drawing on place-based and mobilitiesinformed theoretical frameworks; 2) analysing the student interaction with digital resources over time, using theory-informed learning analytics methods which aim to account for student engagement and how it is impacted by specialised feedback.

image: Hieratic copy of the Teaching of Amenemhat I. Public domain image from The Met.