GCRF Urban Disaster Risk Hub

The GCRF Urban Disaster Risk Hub will work across 12 partner countries and 54 partner organisations to bring disaster risk management to the centre of global urban policy and practice, strengthening the voice and capacity of the urban poor.

Rapid urbanisation presents a time-limited global opportunity to embed disaster risk management in urban development.  The Hub will enhance sustainable urban development, catalysing a transition from crisis management to disaster risk-informed planning and decision-making in cities in developing countries, through partnerships in and between targeted cities (Quito, Nairobi, Kathmandu and Istanbul), and globally through collaborating international governance organisations.  Bringing together leading researchers with inspiring community and government leaders, the Hub will at an unprecedented scale to deliver real impact through interdisciplinary research.

 

Objectives

The GCRF Urban Disaster Risk Hub will contribute towards the following UN sustainable development goals to transform our world:

- No Poverty

- Sustainable Cities and Communities

- Climate Action

- Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

- Partnerships for the Goals

 

Find out more:

School of Geosciences

UKRI 

 

Research areas
Digital Cultures
Research team

Professor John McCloskey, School of GeoSciences (PI) with a large interdisciplinary, international team of researchers, policy makers, civil society groups and UN agencies.

Education contact: Professor Sian Bayne

Funding

UKRI Global Challenges Research Fund, £19.6m

Dates
-

Related news

UKRI GCRF Urban Disaster Risk Hub website launch

22 Oct 2019
Website screenshot

The UKRI GCRF Urban Disaster Risk Hub project have launched their website www.tomorrowscities.org

Tomorrow’s Cities is a 5 year $25m interdisciplinary research hub led by collaborations of local experts and practitioners based in four rapidly developing, multi-hazard-exposed cities, and is supported by an international network of specialists.  

The four focus cities, Kathmandu, Nairobi, Quito and Istanbul, face multiple hazards including earthquakes, landslides, flooding and volcanoes.